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News Article Rubric for Middle or High School Students

By Trent Lorcher

End the grading hassle with this easy-to-use news article rubric.

News Article Rubric for Teachers Show students how to write a news article. When they forget, remind them how to write an article again with the following well-organized rubric. Students may also find this article helpful in coming up with ideas and perfecting the news-writing style.

"A" Article

  • Components:

    The article contains six components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written with the most important information first.

  • Style:

    The story contains an interesting lead which hooks the reader.

  • Language:

    All sentences are clear, concise, and well written. Many details are included. Many active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains short paragraphs that flow together. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase.

"B" Article

  • Components:

    The article contains five components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written with the most important information contained within the article.

  • Style:

    The story contains an interesting lead which hooks the reader but dies not capture the true meaning of the article.

  • Language:

    Most sentences are clear, concise, and well written. Many details are included. Many active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article mostly contains short paragraphs that flow together. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase but does not capture the true meaning of the article.

"C" Article

  • Components:

    The article contains three or four components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The information makes sense but the organization is somewhat confusing.

  • Style:

    The lead does not hook the reader nor does it convey the true meaning of the article.

  • Language:

    Many of the sentences are too long, run-ons, or fragments. Very few details are included. Very few active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains paragraphs which are mostly too long and do not lead to the next paragraph. The last paragraph ends with a quote or catchy phrase that does not capture the true meaning of the article.

"D" Article

  • Components:

    The article contains one or two components of a news story (who, what, when, where, why, and how).

  • Organization:

    The article is written in no logical order.

  • Style:

    There is no lead to the story.

  • Language:

    Most of the sentences are too long, run-ons, or fragments. Very few details are included. Very few active words are used.

  • Paragraphs:

    The article contains no paragraphs or paragraphs which are mostly too long and do not lead to the next paragraph. The last paragraph does not end with a quote or catchy phrase that does not capture the true meaning of the article.