Adverb Games: Ideas for Fun Adverb Activities in the Classroom

Grammar Activities: Adverbs

By Keren Perles

Bored with the usual grammar lesson plans, and looking for something different? Try these adverb activities with your students. All students love games, and these adverb games are no different!

Act It Out!

Begin with grammar activities that make sure that students understand how to use adverbs. On your desk, place a pile of notecards with adverbs on them, as well as a pile of notecards with verbs on them. Have students take turns picking a notecard from each pile and acting out the action that the cards show. For example, if the cards are “walk" and “stealthily," the student might tiptoe carefully around the room, looking around to make sure she’s not being followed. Then have students guess the verb and the adverb that were chosen, and reveal the notecard as students guess correctly.

Charades

Divide up the adverb notecards and give them to groups of students. Have each group decide on a verb, and instruct each member of the group to apply the verb to their notecard. For example, if a group decides on the verb “dance," the students in the group may have to dance happily, dance stealthily, dance quickly, or dance loudly, depending on which adverb card they are holding. The other students have to guess which adverb card each of their peers are holding. Adverb games like this one can get loud and exciting, so make sure to circulate around the room to make sure that students are staying on track.

Adjective-Adverb Swap

This adverb activity can help show students that adjectives and adverbs are related. Have students write sentences using adverbs that end in -ly. Then have them change the adverbs in their sentences into adjectives by removing the –ly, and have them recraft the sentence accordingly. For example, the sentence “The boy agreed happily" might change to “The happy boy agreed." Discuss the similarities and differences between the two sentences.

No –ly Words Allowed!

Have students break into groups, and instruct each group to write a list of as many adverbs as they can in three minutes. The catch? They can’t use any adverbs that end in –ly. Because most students think of –ly words when they think of adverbs, you might want to remind them about the basic definition of adverbs – words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs and answer the questions where, when, how, or to what extent. You can even start them off with several examples (e.g., yesterday, too, very).

These adverb activities are a great way to spice up your grammar lessons. Try some of these adverb games today, and watch your students finally get interested in parts of speech!

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